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Two top tips for #SelfCareWeek2017

Date: November 16th, 2017
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Gratitude heart

Being in a good mood and feeling optimistic about the day ahead are wonderful feelings. It can help us face the daily challenges with good grace. Open a door for someone, call a relative who might be feeling lonely or give someone a genuine compliment – all great ways of boosting our wellbeing and our positive mood can influence those around us.

When there is a national awareness week, it helps us reflect on our behaviour and, for some, it’s a time to learn new skills or develop new good habits inspired by the information available during the campaign.

This week is national Self Care Week and we want to share our two top tips for self-care.


Research in recent years is pointing to the wonderful effect that gratitude can have on our wellbeing. Findings suggest that we can increase our happiness by up to 25% if we devote time to being grateful for simple things in our lives, such as the sunshine peeping through white puffy clouds, the affectionate touch of a loved one or the fresh water that is replenishing us and quenching our thirst.

Studies have found that people who concentrate on being grateful are more satisfied with their lives overall, more optimistic about the upcoming week and importantly, sleep better. When we sleep we replenish and restore and commit learning to memory and people who sleep well are generally healthier and happier than those whose sleep is poor. Here is more detail about the research.

Talking and listening

People are social creatures and we are hard wired to make good connections with others. Our health depends on it. Talking helps us understand our worries and challenges and in conversation we can benefit from hearing a different perspective to our own. Being listened to – really listened to in a non-judgmental way – can be uplifting and therapeutic. Try truly listening to your loved one and watch the effect it can have. Ask them how if feels not to be interrupted but to be asked for more detail when they pause to think.

These two self-care tips are powerful and cost nothing. We’d love to hear from you with your tips and stories. Have you tried writing a gratitude journal or practicing non-judgmental listening? What’s been the effect on your wellbeing?

For more information about self-care you might like to take a look at this NHS website.

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